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Horace Nye Nursing Home sale complete

April 3, 2014
By MATTHEW TURNER (mturner@adirondackdailyenterprise.com) , Lake Placid News

Essex County's Horace Nye Nursing Home was finally purchased by a private nursing home company, after a month-long delay. The building was renamed the Essex Center.

County officials thought the deal would be done in early February, but a legal issue the company had concerning the septic system slowed the process down.

"Its nice that it's over," county attorney Daniel Manning said. "It's been put to bed."

Centers for Specialty Care, a Bronx-based company that operates nursing homes in New York and New Jersey, has been working on the sale with the county for over a year. The real estate and property was sold for $4.05 million, as both parties originally agreed.

The county and Centers for Specialty Care had signed a sale contract back in March 2013, and the company made a down payment at that time. The final transfer occurred on March 20, with the county being paid a few days later, Manning said. All but a handful of the 135 former county employees who worked at Horace Nye will be switched over in to the new company.

The back and forth between the company and county over the septic system was settled with a deal to clean the sewer and set up a $75,000 escrow fund through a third party.

"The escrow fund is to make sure we do the work," Manning said.

The county has been dealing with the sewer issues for three months and plans to follow through on their end of the bargain soon, Manning said.

"Once we choose a qualified contractor, we will go forward with it." Manning said.

A second phase of a pair of studies done by the company revealed problem areas within the sewer and with other issues.

"There were six or seven problems we had to deal with," Manning said. "We had to remove an underground storage tank, and we had to repair an existing storage tank. The one we couldn't fix in time was the work on the septic."

Most of the work was done through the county's Department of Public Works. The costs to complete those projects were around three or four thousand dollars, Manning said.

The county sold the home to stop annual deficits of nearly $2 million.

 
 

 

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